Categories


Authors

How to make a Brazilian Feijoada

The story goes that the Portuguese farm owners would keep the best parts of pork for themselves and send the offcuts to the slave house to be added to a large vat of black beans... and voilá, Brazil's national dish was creaed - The Feijoada. Reality may have been a bit different. The story goes that the Portuguese farm owners would keep the best parts of pork for themselves and send the offcuts to the slave house to be added to a large vat of black beans... and voilá, Brazil's national dish was creaed - The Feijoada. Reality may have been a bit different.

The dish was quite popular back in Portugal even before it made its way to Brazil and the Portuguese were well known for not wasting any peaces of a pig. In fact, offcuts like trotters, ears, tails or even snout, were treasured delicacies. So it's unlikely the slaves had anything other than bones and a bit of cassava flower added to their diets.

Feijoada is not only a good wholesome dish, but it's also ideal to serve on large parties. It's delicious and filling, relatively cheap, as it's all prepared in one big pot and boiled over a number of hours, you can have it ready ages before the party. In fact, depending on the space in your fridge, you can prepare your feijoada the day before. This will leave more time for you to prepare the other treasures of Brazilian cooking which are usually served with a feijoada: Farofa, re-fried rice, fried greens (Couve) and some refreshing slices of fresh orange.

And don't forget the liquid accompaniment. Although light beers (Brazilians drink Chop - a light lager) are ideal to refresh the palate, a proper true Brazilian Caipirinha is required to make this an authentic Brazilian experience.

[stumble]

Feijão - Brazilian Black Beans

What would you do for a refreshing Guarana?